Hinamatsuri dolls

Hina-matsuri: Japanese traditions

Hinamatsuri (雛祭), also known as Doll’s day or Girls’ Day, is celebrated on March 3. On this day, platforms—hinadan—are covered with red material and used to display ornamental dolls. The dolls represent the Emperor, Empress, attendants and musicians, in the traditional court dress of the Heian period. Read more

Japanese diet. Vegetables From The Sea: to help you look and feel better.

The health benefits of a Japanese diet

The Traditional Japanese breakfast served at Shizuka Ryokan exemplifies Japanese cuisine. Grilled salmon, hijiki seaweed, miso, pickled daikon radish, umeboshi plum and furikake seasoning are regular features around here. Not only are these foods delicious, they are beneficial to health. Read more

Valentine's Day. Pink coloured kitkat with decorative box. A new addition to Japanese tradition.

Valentine’s Day and White Day: Japanese traditions

Did you forget to buy your lovely lady some flowers last Valentine’s Day? Shizuka Ryokan forgives you; you were probably just following Japanese tradition.

In Japan men don’t have to worry about shopping for jewellery or flowers in February because Valentine’s Day is celebrated differently there; for the Japanese, Valentine’s is a day when women shower men with chocolates. Read more

Cartoon depiction of the many fruit and vegetables available at the farmers' market.

Farmers’ markets near Shizuka Ryokan

You might be in for a treat—your visit to Shizuka Ryokan might coincide with a local farmers’ market. Farmers’ markets enable personal connections between growers and consumers. By cutting out the middlemen, local growers receive more food dollars and shoppers receive fresh, in season produce which supports the local community. To learn more visit the Australian Farmers’ Markets Association. Read more